ALASTAIR MILES BASS
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REVIEWS

Images of Alastair Miles in costume are credited here



2015
Lucia Di Lammermoor, The Met
The English basso Alastair Miles was excellent as Raimondo ( Metropolitan Opera, March 2015 ), the Lammermoor chaplain and Lucia’s tutor.
Wilborn Hampton, Huffington Post
The only performance worth noting during the first two acts was the strong singing of Alastair Miles as the chaplain Raimondo. So central is Miles to holding your attention, you start to think that maybe the opera should have been called Raimondo di Lammermoor. Not to mention his deep bass voice was as nimble as a tenor’s
Steven Pisano, Feast of Music
As Raimondo, bass Alastair Miles was a gentle Raimondo. He was subdued during the duet with Lucia, his voice tender throughout. But when he came in between Enrico and Edgardo after the sextet, his voice boomed throughout the theater as the man of reason. However, he was frail in his “Oh! Qual funesto avvenimento!” He sang quietly, almost as if he was afraid to relate what he had just seen, thus forcing the listener in and adding greater suspense to the narration.
Latin Post
2014
Don Giovanni, Vlaamse Opera
D’un autre côte le Leporello de l’excellent Alastair Miles apporte une réelle plus-value au plateau grâce.. un art du chant accompli et un don inn... pour la comédie. Le chanteur britannique exploite, sans en rajouter, la fibre comique du personnage auquel il apporte des fêlures bien humaines... une remarquable composition.
ConcertoNet.com
CD: Lieder by Wolf and Brahms
This is a noble recording, but only if you take it in several doses, otherwise you might succumb to the melancholy which was Brahms's regular state, or even the more desperate condition into which Wolf descended. They were contemporaries, but their allegiances were diametrically opposed: Wolf a passionate Wagnerian, Brahms a self-conscious member of the Classical tradition. The songs on this disc show them as close as they ever got, settings of poems and texts of almost unrelieved earnestness and gravity. Alastair Miles launches his recital with Wolf's titanic Prometheus, sounding like Wotan at the end of his tether. The next song, The Limits Of Mankind, also Wolf, takes us to the opposite pole: ' a small ring is the limit of our life'. This pair makes an ideal coupling, and with the Three Poems Of Michelangelo, Wolf's last and profoundest utterances, show him in his darkest light. 

The first set of Brahms is, by contrast, peaceful and even contented. The CD finishes with the Four Serious Songs, from the end of his life, ranging from the anguish of Oh Death, how bitter you are to the exalted setting of Corinthians I, verses 1-13. To my mind Brahms's music fails to rise to the sublimity of Paul's text, but Miles, here as throughout, uses his powerful, truly bass voice to magnificent effect. And the accompaniments of Marie-Noëlle Kendall provide the perfect support for what is a most impressive and elevating sombre disc. 

Performance: 5 stars.
Michael Tanner, BBC Music Magazine

The album title Lieder by Wolf and Brahms doesn’t suggest any thematic rationale for the choice of songs, but everything in this well planned program is about life’s limits and struggles—death, sorrow, solitude, revenge, longing for love, world-weariness, and the afterlife—presented in alternating groups of songs by the two composers, including three Wolf settings of Michelangelo poems in German translation and Brahms’s Four Serious Songs.
It’s a somber and sober program and Miles has an ideal basso cantabile voice for low voice songs. His strong bottom notes and his rich tonal color emphasize the darkness, bleakness, and weightiness of the songs in a way that commands attention.
Wolf’s setting of Goethe’s Prometheus begins the recital boldly. As Natasha Loges remarks so aptly in her excellent notes, “These testosterone-driven 174 bars threaten to overwhelm the limits of the genre with their tumult.?Kendall immediately establishes her mastery of the vivid accompaniment and Miles uses just the right snarly tone to express the protagonist’s indignant raging against the gods.
Two other substantial Goethe settings by Wolf follow. In Grenzen der Menschheit Miles tempers his voice in resignation to life’s transience, and Kendall’s well judged pacing of the postlude seals the message.
Everything about this recital is commendable. While his reading of Brahms’s Feldeinsamkeit is more muscular than Fischer-Dieskau’s sublimely floated approach, it is still a convincing reading. Whether it is through employing an operatic approach in Prometheus or bringing a gently introspective expression toAlles Endet, Was Entstehetin the second Michelangelo song Miles always elucidates the text in a convincing manner.
There are other fine recordings of Brahms’s Four Serious Songs, but there is none I would choose over this. After singing of life’s sorrows, the program comes to a glowing conclusion with the final lines of Wenn Ich mit Menschen affirming that in spite of everything untoward in life “now are left Faith, Hope, and Love, these three: but Love is the greatest of them.?
I’ve long admired this artist’s singing but never more than here. Kendall’s accompaniment is everything you could hope for. With such gifted collaboration this is extraordinarily moving music-making—and the recorded sound is first rate.
The notes point out aspects of the personal relationship between Wolf and Brahms and the thematic connections between their songs. Notes, texts, translations.
Robert Moore, American Record Guide
A nobly sung recital, confirming that the leading English operatic basso cantante is also a Lieder singer of intelligence and insight. 
Gramophone
After the 174 bars of hectic introduction to Wolf's Prometheus, Miles's voice bursts into the first line of the song with a vengeance. And so it continues through the programme - a rich and resonant tone, even throughout its easy range, excellent diction and a strong identification with the text. Marie-Noëlle Kendall's accompaniment matches her singer all the way and she seizes her opportunities to show her formidable technique without unbalancing the relationship. 
Francis Muzzo, OperaNow

The clashing opening chords of Wolf's Prometheus launch this recital, powerfully pounded by pianist Marie-Noëlle Kendall. Alastair Miles does not hold back in Prometheus's condemnation, except that in the third verse he uses a more lyrical tone and legato... By employing mezza voce and delivering the long lines with good breath control, Miles gives a more human feel to Grenzen der Menschheit (nice postlude from Kendall). Being on fine form vocally for this recital he encompasses Der Sänger clearly. Wolf's gloomy opening lines [Michelangelo Lieder] make way for outgoing expression, to which Miles and Kendall build exultantly... in the next song. Alles endet, was entstehet, Miles conveys an emptiness, very effectively managed by reducing the voice and draining much of its rich tone. In the third and final sonnet... the richness of Miles's tone is back on show. Miles tells the story (Verrat) in mighty voice, enjoyable to hear in itself. From the start to the finish of this CD, Kendall works well with Miles, from the gentle to the unrestricted, and he is in very good voice, all in a clear acoustic. 
John T Hughes, International Record Review

Miles gives us a superb combination of full voice and text. Throughout the disc his diction is admirably vivid and it is clear that for all the power of his voice, for Miles performing these songs is as much about the text. The result in Prometheus is a big-boned, vibrant tour de force... Verrat... he gives a vividly dramatic performance, bringing out the narrative of the story as the ballad setting develops from apparent simplicity to greater complexity... These are all richly satisfying performances, with Miles combining a strong feeling for the text with dramatic intensity of voice, all allied to Kendall's fine piano. 
Robert Hugill, PlanetHugill.com

After the 174 bars of hectic introduction to Wolf's Prometheus, Miles's voice bursts into the first line of the song with a vengeance. And so it continues through the programme - a rich and resonant tone, even throughout its easy range, excellent diction and a strong identification with the text. Marie-Noëlle Kendall's accompaniment matches her singer all the way and she seizes her opportunities to show her formidable technique without unbalancing the relationship. 
Francis Muzzo, OperaNow

The clashing opening chords of Wolf's Prometheus launch this recital, powerfully pounded by pianist Marie-Noëlle Kendall. Alastair Miles does not hold back in Prometheus's condemnation, except that in the third verse he uses a more lyrical tone and legato... By employing mezza voce and delivering the long lines with good breath control, Miles gives a more human feel to Grenzen der Menschheit (nice postlude from Kendall). Being on fine form vocally for this recital he encompasses Der Sänger clearly. Wolf's gloomy opening lines [Michelangelo Lieder] make way for outgoing expression, to which Miles and Kendall build exultantly... in the next song. Alles endet, was entstehet, Miles conveys an emptiness, very effectively managed by reducing the voice and draining much of its rich tone. In the third and final sonnet... the richness of Miles's tone is back on show. Miles tells the story (Verrat) in mighty voice, enjoyable to hear in itself. From the start to the finish of this CD, Kendall works well with Miles, from the gentle to the unrestricted, and he is in very good voice, all in a clear acoustic. 
John T Hughes, International Record Review

Miles gives us a superb combination of full voice and text. Throughout the disc his diction is admirably vivid and it is clear that for all the power of his voice, for Miles performing these songs is as much about the text. The result in Prometheus is a big-boned, vibrant tour de force... Verrat... he gives a vividly dramatic performance, bringing out the narrative of the story as the ballad setting develops from apparent simplicity to greater complexity... These are all richly satisfying performances, with Miles combining a strong feeling for the text with dramatic intensity of voice, all allied to Kendall's fine piano. 
Robert Hugill, PlanetHugill.com
Manon, Royal Opera House, Covent Garden
Best of all, the inky bass of Alastair Miles sends shudders down the spine in the fierce morality of his presence as the Comte des Grieux. 
Hilary  Finch, The Times 

Alastair Miles as Des Grieux (senior) was not just in fine voice; he brought a sureness of touch to every phrase. 
Sebastian Scotney, TheArtsDesk.com 

Alastair Miles sketches in Des Grieux's respectable father with acumen. 
The Stage 

The strong bass of Alastair Miles, as the Comte des Grieux, particularly in Act Four, is patriarchial (sic) judgement incarnate, crashing down on his son, the Chevalier, and on Manon. 
Sarah Stewart, Londonist.com 

The supporting cast is equally strong, with outstanding turns from Alastair Miles as des Grieux Senior. 
Whatsonstage.com 

Alastair Miles' strong voice contributes to an excellent portrayal of Le Comte des Grieux  
Sam Smith, MusicOMH.com


2013


Anna Bolena, Welsh National Opera, UK
Alastair Miles's Enrico is a tour de force of gritty, granite bass characterisation, striated with the cruelty of weakness.
Hilary Finch, The Times

Alastair Miles turns in one of his best performances as a thuggish Enrico.
Andrew Clark, The Financial Times

Bass Alastair Miles is commanding as Henry; his scraggly hair makes him look more barbaric than regal, but that's the way this king behaves.
George Loomis, The New York Times

Maria Stuarda, Welsh National Opera, UK
The bass Alastair Miles, whose sanguine authority is ever intact whatever role he plays, was the loyal Talbot, tenderly preparing Mary for the scaffold. 
Fiona Maddocks, The Observer


Mr Miles sings warmly as Mary's consoling Talbot.

George Loomis, The New York Times




2012


Don Giovanni, Opera North, Grand Theatre, Leeds, UK 

... outstanding [performance...] from Alastair Miles as Leporello. This is one of the great comic roles, and he plays it to perfection. You will not see a better Leporello anytime soon.
The Independent

Alastair Miles' Leporello is really impressive. He is a versatile actor with a voice like dark chocolate, spot-on when it comes to the lowest notes

bachtrack

For this writer though, the revelation of the evening was Alastair Miles' realisation of Leporello. I have seen this fine singer in "heavy" roles viz Mephistopheles, King Philip II, Zaccaria - to imagine that such nimble movement, comic timing and amusing facial expressions lurked beneath a somewhat dour exterior. Vocally and dramatically his Leporello is all that I could have wished; delivery of the Catalogue Aria showed that Miles is equally at home in the 'basso buffo' repertory. In fact he's miles better (forgive the pun!) than any previous Leporello that I can recall since I saw Geraint Evans and Gabriel Bacquier decades ago.
Opera Britannia


Judas Maccabaeus, BBC Proms, Royal Albert Hall
... the brilliantly authoritative tone of bass Alastair Miles, who was stepping in at the last minute... Taking on the two roles of Simon and Eupolemus, Miles excelled in every aria... he exuded regal power... The Lord Worketh Wonders (Handel in Messiah-and-I –will-shake mode) was delivered with first-rate articulation and fantastic projection, even in the lower register.
Dominic Wells, Opera Britannia




2011


Die Meistersinger von Nurnberg, Glyndebourne Festival Opera

Enter the top-hatted Pogner, Alastair Miles, and though he is no black-voiced German bass, he is still magnificent, making one wish, as all great Pogners do, that he didn’t have such long absences from the stage. His scene with his daughter Eva at the start of Act II was as moving as anything in the opera, as it should be.
Michael Tanner, The Spectator

The mastersingers were all strongly cast, pride of place going to Alastair Miles as an immensely sympathetic Pogner, whose warm bass sound and sense of melodic line made his passages of narration as enjoyable as they should be.
musicalcriticism.com

Alastair Miles’s Pogner was in every sense the voice of experience.
The Independent

Alastair Miles (in terrific voice) is dogmatic yet touching as Pogner.
Entartete Musik


Lucrezia Borgia
, English National Opera 

Alastair Miles, aside from possessing an extremely powerful bass-baritone, also gave one of the most dramatically captivating performances of the evening in his role as Lucrezia Borgia’s husband, Alfonso d’Este. His dark, expansive and open sound, coupled with perfect diction, soared over ENO’s excellent orchestra with perfect ease, and his tall, imposing figure and confident manner on stage added real dramatic weight to his performance.
musicomh.com

The bass Alastair Miles was vocally stentorian and aptly censorious as Lucrezia's husband.
New York Times

Alastair Miles’s bass is dark, and his gestures sturdy.
londonist.com


Alastair Miles sang with notable elegance as the creepy Mr Lucrezia Borgia (aka Duke d’Este).
The Observer

There are equally strong performances from Alastair Miles as Lucrezia’s appalling husband Alfonso.
The Guardian

As Lucrezia’s repulsive husband, Alastair Miles is an appreciable asset.
The Stage

Alastair Miles (that rare thing, a lithe bass) had fun with Alfonso.
The Independent

Alastair Miles gives a sharply etched portrayal as Alfonso, Lucrezia’s husband.
whatsonstage.com

Alastair Miles was darkly expressive and managed a welcome degree of physical characterisation that carried to my balcony seat.
intermezzo.com

Alastair Miles brought a vivid, wicked persuasive and manipulative delight to his role as he twisted his voice around Rutter’s and this was the high point of the evening for me.
gscene.com

Alastair Miles’s sturdily sung Alfonso...
Financial Times

Alastair Miles is a fine Titian-look-a-like Alfonso d’Este.
Wall Street Journal

The image of the real Alfonso, Alastair Miles spits and thunders with authority.n
Independent on Sunday

Alastair Miles is an imposing Alfonso.
The Opera Critic

Alastair Miles was a mellifluous and sonorous Alfonso d’Este.

Great to see and hear the wonderful bass of Alastair Miles, an ENO favourite, here in the part of Alfonso d’Este, still magnificently resonant of voice and with wonderful stage presence born of huge experience.
musicweb-international.com



2010


CD: Don Carlos



Miles is superb as the haunted Philip. 


Best of the principals are Alastair Miles's distinctive King Philip, John Tomlinson's terrifying Grand Inquisitor and Clive Bailey's Monk.


BBC Music Magazine


Alastair Miles's Philip II is a more fiery interpretation of the King than many others in recorded terms, and he really sings off the words and brings the character to theatrical life... the encounter with John Tomlinson's terrifyingly implacable and vocally imposing Grand Inquisitor is the highlight it should be... Taken as a whole this is an exciting issue, most remarkable for the compelling contributions of Alastair Miles and for Richard Farnes's refreshingly non-fussy and non-indulgent reading of the score.


2009

CD: Rossini, The Italian Girl in Algiers (highlights)

Rossini Italian Girl CD cover

Happily, the three men in her [Jennifer Larmore's] life are equally vividly characterised: Alan Opie as her hang-dog admirer Taddeo, Barry Banks a most eloquent Lindoro, and Alastair Miles as the lascivious Mustafa. Fifty years ago there was barely a bass in Europe who could find his way around Mustafa's bumbling coloratura, let alone project the text as Miles does here.

Gramophone
, June 2009



CD: Richard Strauss, The Complete Songs Volume 4

Strauss Songs CD cover

It has to be said that with the first sound of Alastair Miles, one is immediately aware of a change, not merely in the quality and nature of the voice, but in its production too. ...Miles impresses deeply, down indeed to the depths of his low D flat.

Gramophone
, 
June 2009 (link not available yet)


The bass songs show Strauss once again in predominantly serious vein, and Alastair Miles brings a wonderful gravitas to his readings. Im Spätboot is a sober affair, but all the more affecting for its economy, not perhaps what one would expect from Strauss a year after Salome. The four songs from Op.87 are made up of three pensive and expansive Rückert settings (from 1929 and 1935), leavened with a boisterous, earlier setting of a poem from Goethe'sWest-östliche Diwan, Erschaffen und Beleben. Miles brings the same steady, authoritative delivery and seriousness of purpose to the Rückert, rising to the occasional emotional outbursts magnificently (particularly in the lovely Im Sonnenschein that finishes the disc), while he and Vignoles make the most of the sometimes arch humour of Erschaffen und Beleben.


Alastair Miles's robust, sensitive bass excels in Im Spätboot, perfectly capturing the eerie dark atmosphere of Strauss's weary boat passeng
er.


Mendelssohn: Elias, Théâtre des Champs-Élysées

Alastair Miles s'acquittait avec honneur d'un rôle écrasant. Le chant était, comme toujours, probe et les vocalises aisées.
 

Alastair Miles campe un prophète de haute stature, terrible ou abattu. Ce familier de l'oratorio Haendelien peut assumer sans peine les vocalises de Ist nicht des Herren Wort, émouvoir dans un Es ist genug au phras?irreprochable.

2008


Stravinski: The Rake's Progress, Theater an der Wien

Sehr zur Freude von Nick Shadow, jenem Teufel, der in Gestalt des charaktervoll toenenden Basses Alastair Miles ganz zeitgemaess die Spaetzuenderdaemonie eines Anlageberaters verstroemmt. 
Very pleasing was Nick Shadow (the Devil) played by the characterful and sonorous bass Alastair Miles who portrayed him as a modern financial consultant waiting till the last moment to reveal his diabolic intentions.

Die Presse


The latter virtue [excellent diction] was shared with his alter ego, Alastair Miles, a very plausible tempter, not too demonic until their last scene together - one of the best things I have seen from him. 

Opera





 Beethoven's Ninth Symphony,
 New York (Tilson Thomas)

Best of the lot was bass Alastair Miles

New York Sun




CD: 
La Cour de Celimene 


Miles is a bubbling comic delight with a strong, enchantingly merry delivery

American Record Guide

 
Alastair Miles negotiates the coloratura with his customary aplomb
Fanfare


Alastair Miles is also at his best as Le Commandeur de Beaupré an attractive comic creation that nearly steals the show. 

musicalcriticism.com



Alastair Miles impresses as the affably cynical Commander, more excited by property than love.


The Daily Telegraph

                                                                                                                    
... it also features a sparkling score and is very ably performed by soprano Laura Claycomb and bass Alastair Miles in particular. Frothy fun. Alastair Miles enjoys himself in his role of worldly aristocrat with the attributes of a virtuoso and a buffo bass. EDITOR'S CHOICE.

The Gramophone




2007 


Damnation de Faust, Welsh National Opera


Dominant throughout with sheer presence is Alastair Miles, his measured, powerfully voiced Mephistopheles sinister rather than flamboyantly diabolic, the very embodiment of evil.

The Stage




Lucia di Lammermoor, Netherlands Opera


Einen Politiker der Kirche, der taktiert, abwägt und demagogisch manipuliert, präsentierte mit grosser Stimme und beeindruckender Kultur Alastair Miles[Raimondo]

Das Opernglass


Alastair Miles [Raimondo] thundered impressively.

Opera


2006


Sir John In Love, English National Opera


As Brook, Alastair Miles' uptight Ford explodes like Peter Cook on speed.
The Stage


Miles suggests Ford’s volcanic jealousy in a brilliantly underplayed, funny and touching account of the role.

Hugh Canning, The Sunday Times




La Juive
, Royal Opera House


Alastair Miles gave the performance of his life as Cardinal Brogni.

Evening Standard


As Eleazar’s great rival Cardinal Brogni, Alastair Miles?authority was self-evident with chills and compassion exacted from his charismatic bottom notes. 

The Independent


This bravura part [Brogni] was extravagantly sung by Alastair Miles who exhibited splendid low notes, so cavernous that I expected him to emerge after the interval in pot-holing garb!

musicwebinternational.com




Messiah
, London Symphony Orchestra (CD here)


Far more successful was bass Alastair Miles, who gave probably the best performance I've ever heard from him. To achieve such steady tone, fluid legato and powerful projection through arias such as The Trumpet Shall Sound and Why Do The Nations? is quite something for any artist. It was a shame that we didn't hear more from him.

musicomh.com




Orlando, Bayerische Staatsoper


Der Drahtzieher Zoroastro wirkt umso gefährlicher, als er in Gestalt von Alastair Miles ganz ohne äusseren und stimmlichen Aplomb daherkommt; das seine Bassstimme so leicht und agil geführt wird, hat Seltenheitswert.

Neue Zürcher 
Zeitung


Alastair Miles, ein Altmeister der Alten Musik, singt diesen Heerespsychologen noch immer nobel stilsicher und kleidet sie in eine Figur, die als Mischung aus Monty Python, Mister Q und Donald Rumsfeld angelegt ist.

Suddeutsche Zeitung


Alastair Miles makes much of the sonorous, scheming Zoroastro.

Financial Times




CD: Nabucco, Opera North, Chandos


Alastair Miles proves his pre-eminence among British basses today in Verdi: every note of his two solos is sung with strength and a feeling for line, and he is as happy on high as below. DISC OF THE MONTH.
The Gramophone

2005


Dom Sebastien, Roi de Portugal,
 Royal Opera House


Alastair Miles, as Dom Juan, was a chilling Grand Inquisitor.

The Times


Alastair Miles knows how to sing the bass roles of early nineteenth century Italian and French opera like nobody else these days, and his faultless sense of style was very much in evidence.
mundoclasico.com




Nabucco
, Opera North 


Alastair Miles, hotfoot from singing the chief schemer in Covent Garden’s Dom Sebastien, produced a wealth of dazzling virtuosity as High Priest Zaccaria, the voice admirably supported and effortlessly secure.

The Independent


2004


Ernani, English National Opera


Alastair Miles, done up to look like a darkly malevolent Don Quixote, is a splendid Silva, ferocious in attack, chillingly unforgiving, and more incisive with the text than anyone.

Edward Seckerson, The 
Independent


The bass Alastair Miles makes a magnificent Silva, with effortless smoothness of line and firmness of tone, as well as an impressive stage presence.

Rupert Christiansen, The Daily Telegraph


Alastair Miles fulfils his role's dramatic potential as a deliciously villainous Silva.

The Guardian




Damnation de Faust, 
London Philharmonic Orchestra   


....Alastair Miles’s superb Mephistopheles, mocking and menacing through every vowel.

The Times 

                                                                             
Alastair Miles revealed a dangerous and aggressively devilish Mephistopheles hidden behind a seemingly harmless exterior.

The Guardian


2003


CD: Zaira, Opera Rara


Outstanding among the singers is Alastair Miles in the role of the enlightened Muslim king [Orosmane] in love with Zaira. The writing is for a high lyric bass with the skills of a thorough virtuoso. Miles is exemplary in the evenness and fluency of his scales and gruppetti, and the tessitura suits him admirably.

The Gramophone


Alastair Miles is outstanding in the role of Orosmane, Sultan of Jerusalem.

The Observe
r


Alastair Miles delivers impeccable singing.

BBC Music
 


As Orosmane, the opera’s most sympathetic character, Alastair Miles sings with tonal excellence and the requisite agility for a role created by Antonio Tamburini.

Opera


... Orosmane’s aria in which florid twists and turns are encountered in phrase after phrase, though Alastair Miles, in splendid voice, is in no way fazed. His well-supported tone and clean articulation of notes allow him to realise everyvocal ornament with which Orosmane’s music confronts him. His fleet negotiation of the cabaletta tempted me to repeat it immediately. I succumbed.

International Record Review




Damnation de Faust,
 
London Symphony Orchestra 


Alastair Miles' Mephistopheles matched the orchestra's dramatic sensitivity, and he relished every detail of the supernatural effects Berlioz invents for his character. He jumped up from his seat for his opening lines, just as theorchestra created a malevolent explosion of rasping trombone lines and weird string sounds. And he captured the irony at the heart of the character.

The Guardian


Alastair Miles' Mephistopheles was superbly sung and characterised, the devilry not overdone and all the more sinister, while the sardonic mockery was suitably chilling.

The Sunday Telegraph




La Sonnambula
, Royal Opera House


Alastair Miles as the Count [Rodolfo] sounds deliciously mellifluous.

Evening Standard



Alastair Miles, crisp of tone and suave of manner, is equally well cast as the Count.

Financial Times



Only the excellent Alastair Miles?raffish Count (Noel Coward in Freud-land) sustains a true bel canto line ?Vi ravviso ravished.

The Stage



The most stylish singer on stage was Alastair Miles as Count Rodolfo, very bel canto indeed.

The Times



Alastair Miles' noble bass and striking stage presence made more than acomprimario of the shadowy Count Rodolfo.

The Sunday Times



2002


Elijah, BBC Proms, London Philharmonic Orchestra / Masur


Masur missed nothing, and he had a trump in Alastair Miles?Elijah: commandingly forceful and dramatic in crunching diction, well-tuned and well up to his tricky florid passages.

Financial Times


Alastair Miles isn’t the barnstorming Elijah that Bryn Terfel gave us a few years back, but a burnished, cultured presence at the centre of the work. Miles gave him nobility and strength, particularly in his great resigned recitative It is enough, accompanied by a cello tune of simmering romanticism.

The Times


The drama was there both in Alastair Miles?singing  of the title role, firm-toned with a real unswerving authoritative edge to his voice, and in the urgent choruses.

The Guardian


2001


Nabucco, English National Opera


Alastair Miles'  Zaccaria... noble, fervent, vocally spectacular yet genuinely spiritual... is second to none.

The Guardian


Alastair Miles' Zaccaria is a class act of international standard, quite wonderful singing.

The Times


The great bass role of Zaccaria, the Hebrew high priest, is sung with astonishing fervour and brilliance by Alastair Miles.

The Evening Standard





2000


CD: Alastair Miles ?Great Operatic Arias, Chandos


This is a splendid showcase for the appreciable talents of Alastair Miles, one of the best basses ever produced in this country.

Opera


The sound is well formed and beautifully placed. And everything here is sung with polish and intelligence... sometimes brilliance. 

American Record Guide

                                                                                                        

Don Carlos, Opera North


Alastair Miles is hardly new, but his first King Philip was simply sensational. His sense of Verdian legato is the real thing ?he never seems to take a breath... and his bass tone is contained, darksome, perfectly focussed. His portrayalof this introverted autocrat, crippled by isolation and emotional impotence is already profoundly stirring. What it will be like in ten years time, heaven alone knows.

Rodney Milnes, The Times